Summer at Cornish

Art History

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Dates/Time

July 3 –July 17, F, 1:00pm – 4:00pm

Location

Main Campus Center ,606
1000 Lenora St., Seattle, WA

Registration

The price of this course is $400.00

Course registration will be avaiable on
Monday, December 22, 2014

Description

In this course, students move from introductory to advanced exploration into an historic basis for the visual arts, as they develop not only their technique, but their own methods of investigation, conceptual thinking, and understanding of what it means to be a creative practitioner. Students are encouraged to make connections between different areas of the visual arts and the liberal arts. Art history is interwoven with class practice and making.

Discussed are the surprising and mysterious relationships between seemingly unconnected topics around the globe — from the oldest Paleolithic art to iPad apps, and beyond, into the far future of visual narrative.  Students learn practical tools for analyzing and studying art. Gaining a better understanding of why we create opens up new ways of seeing and making, and provides a valuable framework with which to explore narrative in all its forms — visual, musical, literary, performance, and day-to-day living.  

Coursework is divided between lectures, studio time, reading, and class discussions. Each class practice will be structured around making, short writing projects and small and larger group discussion, based on provided texts.

Students record in their sketchbooks each week, based on coursework, and these journal-like entries are collected into a class booklet for exhibition and record, as well as acting as a finished work and visual and textual syllabus.

Each week: One in-class project, one homework assignment, one slide lecture. 

Areas of focus:

REAL LIFE (ART TO LIFE) 

Connecting art history and culture to your daily life

1) working material from real life—found and reconfigured collecting everyday objects, such as trash and paper to make art

2) slippage between life and art

MIMESIS (REPRESENTATION)

A comparison of ways, in which things are represented, how context frames meaning and intention. How beauty causes us to want to repeat it.

Key tools and materials used include Sharpie pens, Kraft paper and sketchbooks (all provided). Students record in their sketchbooks each week, based on coursework, and these journal-like entries are collected into a class booklet for exhibition and record, as well as acting as a finished work and visual and textual syllabus with a ‘zine aesthetic.

Requirements & Availability

  • Ages
    14 - 18
  • Housing
    Available
  • Scholarships
    Available

Faculty

Gretchen Bennett

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In 2014, Gretchen Frances Bennett completed a postgraduate semester at the Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montpelier, Vermont. Also in 2014, her work was featured in the Jacob Lawrence Gallery, University of Washington and she won a special recognition award for the Betty Bowen from the Seattle Art Museum. In the fall of 2013, she team-taught an advanced interdisciplinary seminar at the University of Washington Fine Arts Department. In 2012, her work was included in exhibitions at Ditch Projects, Springfield, Oregon and The Hedreen Gallery, Seattle University, Seattle, Washington. In 2011, she presented a solo show at Vignettes, Seattle, and her work was featured in the exhibition Heel Gezellig, Grimm Gallery, Amsterdam. She was awarded a residency with The Corporation of Yaddo in 2011. In 2010, she won a Lower Manhattan Cultural Council residency on Governors Island, New York and a studio residency with The Association of Icelandic Visual Artists, Reykjavik, Iceland. Her work was included in the 2010 Seattle Art Museum exhibition, Kurt. She is a founding member of the arts collective, Seattle Catalog LLC (Sea-Cat).