Health & Wellness

Wellness & Health Promotion at Cornish College of the Arts cares about the overall health and well being of the campus community. We invite you to take your personal health into consideration in support of reaching your academic and career goals. We are dedicated to providing programs, resources and education about a variety of college-health related issues. For more information, please contact the Wellness & Educational Programs Director.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Visit Wellness & Health Promotion at MCC for information about:

  • Alcohol and Other Drugs
  • Eating Disorders
  • Fitness & Recreation
  • General Health and Wellness
  • Sexual Health and HIV/AIDS
  • Nutrition
  • Stress Management
  • Suicide Prevention
  • Tobacco
You may also visit the Cornish Counseling Office.

WEB RESOURCES

General Health & Wellness

Stay healthy by getting more SEX (Sleep, Eat and eXercise)!

Many college students deal with late nights or even staying up all night to either get things done or hang out with friends. However, sleep deprivation is a serious issue and can cause impaired decision making, involuntary muscle spasms, micronaps (forced sleep), irritability, intestinal distress and increased stress hormones.

Sleep is your body's way of repairing itself and sorting through the days stresses, so it's important to get a good nights sleep.

Here are some tips that can help guide you to a better night's sleep:

**All of these tips are taken from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Organization website which is part of the National Institutes of Health Organization.

You can read more in depth on the subject here: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/sdd/strategies

Go to bed and wake up at the same time every day.

Yes even on the weekends. Having a consistent schedule will help your body know when it should start winding down for the day and when it should wake up. This should lead to falling asleep faster and having an easier time waking up in the morning.

Use the hour before bed for quiet time. Avoid strenuous exercise and bright artificial light, such as from a TV or computer screen. The light may signal the brain that it's time to be awake.

While it may be tempting to try and browse the web while you fall asleep, it can actually keep your mind active and continuing to process information for the day. When you lay down to go to sleep this should be your body's indicator that it is time to let go of the information from the day and to start relaxing.

Avoid heavy and/or large meals within a couple hours of bedtime. (Having a light snack is okay.)

After eating your heart rate can increase due to the increased blood flow to the stomach. Having an increased heart rate can make it more difficult to sleep, but if your stomach is growling you probably want to have something light before bed so you don't wake up with hunger pains in the middle of the night.

Avoid nicotine (for example, cigarettes) and caffeine (including caffeinated soda, coffee, tea, and chocolate). Nicotine and caffeine are stimulants, and both substances can interfere with sleep. The effects of caffeine can last as long as 8 hours. So, a cup of coffee in the late afternoon can make it hard for you to fall asleep at night.

If you enjoy having something warm to drink before bed, consider trying decaffeinated tea.

Spend time outside every day (when possible) and be physically active.

Exercise can release feel good endorphins that boost your mood. Exercise can also improve your energy levels during the day and make it a bit easier to sleep at night.

Keep your bedroom quiet, cool, and dark (a dim night light is fine, if needed).

Many of us have been there, unable to sleep because someone left a light on or breaking out in a sweat from it being too warm in your room. Some of you may sleep better with the exact opposite! We have a section on sleeping habits for our housing questions so be sure to fill them out. As always, please be respectful of your roommate's sleep preferences as well as your own.

Take a hot bath or use relaxation techniques before bed.

Having that warm comfortable feeling can not only relax you mentally, but the hot water from the bath can help your muscles wind down after a long day. You could also use relaxation bath salts. Some relaxation techniques you could try before bed include: slowly tightening and releasing each muscle individually if possible to teach your body it's time to relax, deep breathing exercises while trying to clear your mind, taking a moment to be aware of your posture; are your shoulders tight or held up higher? Are your clenching your jaw? A little awareness can go a long way in relaxing the rest of your body.


How can you tell if you might not be getting enough sleep?

How sleepy you feel during the day can help you figure out whether you're having symptoms of problem sleepiness. You might be sleep deficient if you often feel like you could doze off while:

  • Sitting and reading or watching TV
  • Sitting still in a public place, such as a movie theater, meeting, or classroom
  • Riding in a car for an hour without stopping
  • Sitting and talking to someone
  • Sitting quietly after lunch
  • Sitting in traffic for a few minutes

Sleep deficiency can cause problems with learning, focusing, and reacting. You may have trouble making decisions, solving problems, remembering things, controlling your emotions and behavior, and coping with change. You may take longer to finish tasks, have a slower reaction time, and make more mistakes.

To learn more about how to tell if you have problem sleepiness and when to talk to a doctor go to: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/sdd/signs

Cornish has meal plans for students that can help give you a balanced diet. Nellie's cafe puts a lot of thought into their dishes and they have many nutritious and tasty options! We have options for meat eaters, vegetarians, vegans and pescetarians alike. If you have food allergies we can accommodate for that as well as long as we know what your dietary needs are. Making sure to eat breakfast, lunch and dinner is important so don't skip out! Breakfast kicks your metabolism into gear and helps you stay awake and alert in the morning, which is great because no one wants to be the person falling asleep in class or the one with the loud stomach growl. Ask your teachers what their policy is on food because sometimes it's alright to bring it with you into the classroom, but please be respectful if they request there is no food in the classroom. You can even see the menu for the day at: http://cornish.cafebonappetit.com/cafe/nellies-cafe/

Exercising is a great way to increase your energy levels and keep you fit for all of the hills and walking you will no doubt do in Seattle. Walking can feel like a chore here with the steep inclines, but there are also many places that are within walking distance and some classes will require walking to museums. For resident students we have a gym on the 20th floor of our Cornish Commons building that has a treadmill, multiple ellipticals and stationary bikes as well as a ballet bar, leg press and weight station. For non resident students or commuter students, you can use the 20th floor work out room ONLY IF you are accompanied by a resident. However we do have options available off campus if you would like a gym membership.

Gold's Gym at 401 Broadway Ave East offers student prices at a monthly fee of $39.99 and an enrollment fee of $49.00. If you sign up, the first and last month must be paid for as well as the enrollment fee which totals to $128.98 at signup.

To see more information on this gym please go to: http://www.goldsgym.com/

Flow Fitness at 311 Terry Ave North offers student prices at $39.99 a month with a same day enrollment fee of $39.00. If enrollment is not on the same day the price is $69.00. This totals to either $69.99 same day signup or $108.99 for delayed signup.

Students will not have access to the gym at Flow Fitness during peak hours. These hours are as listed:

6:30am-7:30am

11:00am-1:00pm

6:30pm-7:30pm

To see more information on this gym please go to: http://www.flowfitnessseattle.com/

Food & Nutrition

You might often hear discussions about basic nutrition, but where can you really go to find that information without sifting through the internet for hours? Well look no further! Here we have included food group information directly from the United States Department of Agriculture including information as what is counted in each food group and daily serving recommendations.

Information is retrieved directly from the government website Choose My Plate. If you would like to learn more, or view the 'ounce equivalent' tables (ex: how many slices of bread is one ounce of grains) please go to http://www.choosemyplate.gov and choose a food group to explore. Then select 'view food gallery. On the left side you will select 'view all about the ______ group where the blank is the food group you selected. This is the page where most of the information is pulled from and where you can view the table information.


What foods are included in the Grains Group?

Any food made from wheat, rice, oats, cornmeal, barley or another cereal grain is a grain product. Bread, pasta, oatmeal, breakfast cereals, tortillas, and grits are examples of grain products.

Grains are divided into 2 subgroups, Whole Grains and Refined Grains. Whole grains contain the entire grain kernel ― the bran, germ, and endosperm. Examples of whole grains include whole-wheat flour, bulgur (cracked wheat), oatmeal, whole cornmeal, and brown rice. Refined grains have been milled, a process that removes the bran and germ. This is done to give grains a finer texture and improve their shelf life, but it also removes dietary fiber, iron, and many B vitamins. Some examples of refined grain products are white flour, de-germed cornmeal, white bread, and white rice.

How many grains are recommended daily?

The amount of grains you need to eat depends on your age, sex, and level of physical activity. Most Americans consume enough grains, but few are whole grains. At least half of all the grains eaten should be whole grains. 

*Note the following amounts are appropriate for individuals who get less than 30 minutes per day of moderate physical activity, beyond normal daily activities. Those who are more physically active may be able to consume more while staying within calorie needs.

Women Age 14 to 50 - 6 ounce equivalents

Women aged 51+ need 5 ounce equivalents of grains a day.

Men Age 14 to 30 - 8 ounce equivalents

Men Age 31 to 50 - 7 ounce equivalents

Men aged 51+ need 6 ounce equivalents of grains a day.

What foods are included in the Proteins Group?

All foods made from meat, poultry, seafood, beans and peas, eggs, processed soy products, nuts, and seeds are considered part of the Protein Foods Group. Beans and peas are also part of the Vegetable Group. For more information on beans and peas, see Beans and Peas Are Unique Foods.

Select a variety of protein foods to improve nutrient intake and health benefits, including at least 8 ounces of cooked seafood per week. The advice to consume seafood does not apply to vegetarians. Vegetarian options in the Protein Foods Group include beans and peas, processed soy products, and nuts and seeds. Meat and poultry choices should be lean or low-fat.

How much food from the Protein Foods Group is recommended daily?

The amount of food from the Protein Foods Group you need to eat depends on age, sex, and level of physical activity. Most Americans eat enough food from this group, but need to make leaner and more varied selections of these foods.

*Note the following amounts are appropriate for individuals who get less than 30 minutes per day of moderate physical activity, beyond normal daily activities. Those who are more physically active may be able to consume more while staying within calorie needs.

Women Age 14 to 18 - 5 ounce equivalents

Women Age 19 to 30 - 5 1/2 ounce equivalents

Women Age 31 to 51 require 5 ounce equivalents of protein a day.

Men Age 14 to 30 - 6 1/2 ounce equivalents

Men Age 31 to 50 - 6 ounce equivalents

Men aged 51+ require 5 1/2 ounce equivalents of protein a day.

What foods are included in the Vegetables Group?

Any vegetable or 100% vegetable juice counts as a member of the Vegetable Group. Vegetables may be raw or cooked; fresh, frozen, canned, or dried/dehydrated; and may be whole, cut-up, or mashed.

Based on their nutrient content, vegetables are organized into 5 subgroups: dark-green vegetables, starchy vegetables, red and orange vegetables,beans and peas, and other vegetables.

How many vegetables are recommended daily?

The amount of vegetables you need to eat depends on your age, sex, and level of physical activity. Recommended total daily amounts and recommended weekly amounts from each vegetable subgroup are shown below:

*Note the following amounts are appropriate for individuals who get less than 30 minutes per day of moderate physical activity, beyond normal daily activities. Those who are more physically active may be able to consume more while staying within calorie needs.

Women Age 14 to 50 - 2 1/2 Cups a day

Women aged 51+ require 2 cups of vegetables a day.

Men Age 14 to 50 - 3 Cups a day

Men aged 51+ require 2 1/2 cups of vegetables a day.

VEGETABLE SUBGROUP

Women Age 14 to 51+ - 1 1/2 Cups of dark green vegetables a week

Women Age 14 to 50 - 5 1/2 Cups of red and orange vegetables a week

Women aged 51+ require 4 cups of red and orange vegetables a week

Women Age 14 to 50 - 1 1/2 Cups of beans and peas a week

Women aged 51+ require 1 cup of beans and peas a week

Women Age 14 to 50 - 5 cups of starchy vegetables a week

Women aged 51+ require 4 cups of starchy vegetables a week

Women Age 14 to 50 - 4 cups of other vegetables a week

Women aged 51+ require 3 1/2 cups of other vegetables a week

Men Age 14 to 50 - 2 Cups of dark green vegetables a week

Men aged 51+ require 1 1/2 cups of dark green vegetables a week

Men Age 14 to 50 - 6 cups of red and orange vegetables a week

Men aged 51+ require 5 1/2 cups of red and orange vegetables a week

Men Age 14 to 50 - 2 Cups of beans and peas a week

Men aged 51+ require 1 1/2 cups of beans and peas a week

Men Age 14 to 50 - 6 cups of starchy vegetables a week

Men aged 51+ require 5 cups of starchy vegetables a week

Men Age 14 to 50 - 5 cups of other vegetables a week

Men aged 51+ require 4 cups of other vegetables a week

What foods are included in the Fruit Group?

Any fruit or 100% fruit juice counts as part of the Fruit Group. Fruits may be fresh, canned, frozen, or dried, and may be whole, cut-up, or pureed.

How much fruit is recommended daily?

The amount of fruit you need to eat depends on age, sex, and level of physical activity.

*Note the following amounts are appropriate for individuals who get less than 30 minutes per day of moderate physical activity, beyond normal daily activities. Those who are more physically active may be able to consume more while staying within calorie needs.

Women Age 14 to 18 - 1 1/2 cups

Women Age 19 to 30 - 2 cups

Women aged 31 to 51+ require 1 1/2 cups of fruit a day.

Men aged 14 to 51+ require 2 cups of fruit a day.

What foods are included in the Dairy Group?

All fluid milk products and many foods made from milk are considered part of this food group. Most Dairy Group choices should be fat-free or low-fat. Foods made from milk that retain their calcium content are part of the group. Foods made from milk that have little to no calcium, such as cream cheese, cream, and butter, are not. Calcium-fortified soymilk (soy beverage) is also part of the Dairy Group.

How much food from the Dairy Group is recommended daily?

The amount of food from the Dairy Group you need to eat depends on age.

Women and men aged 14 to 51+ require 3 cups of dairy a day.

Remember! These are just the basics. You should really consider looking at additional information on the Choose My Plate website. The homepage can be reached here: http://www.choosemyplate.gov/

Fitness & Recreation

These resources include free exercise classes and community park information.

Eating Disorders

These resources include information and assistance both locally and nationally for help with healing an eating disorder.

Sexual Health & HIV/AIDS

Included you will find information and resources across a broad range of sexual health topics including HIV/AIDS.

Alcohol & Other Drugs

These resources include online screening tools and information about alcohol and other drugs including local resources for treatment.

Smoking Cessation

Included you will find resources to help you kick the habit!

Stress Management

These resources should help you stay calm and move on.

Suicide Prevention

Included are online screening tools to help you assess if its time to go see a counselor as well as information if you have a friend or family member struggling with suicidal ideation.