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“Interventions” Brings Art to Nature

“Interventions” Brings Art to Nature

: Ashleigh Robb (AR '14) with "Orbis"; "hot pink tethered orbs interpose themselves into a grove of trees" . Photo by Mark Bocek.

“Interventions” Brings Art to Nature

: Carly Garza (AR '15) with "Tree Reliefs"; "using pigmented clay slip on cotton fabric, the artist has created large relief prints taken from tree bark.". Photo by Mark Bocek.

“Interventions” Brings Art to Nature

: Professor Ruth Tomlinson with a tool of the trade, near her own site-specific rockwork, with class artists preparing installations. Photo by Mark Bocek.

“Interventions” Brings Art to Nature

: Aiko Szymczak (AR '15) installs "Earth’s Core Fluidity"; "The connection between line and water". Photo by Mark Bocek.

“Interventions” Brings Art to Nature

: Jayme Aumann (AR '16) prepares to launch "Ice"; "I’ve created a temporal happening from forms of ice made from Clark Lake and returned to Clark Lake. I am addressing the state of confinement; all matter is confined, the structure of confinement is only variable". Photo by Mark Bocek.

“Interventions” Brings Art to Nature

: Savannah Filson (AR '16) "Domestic Ground"; "A space of domesticity imposed on the park". Photo by Mark Bocek.

“Interventions” Brings Art to Nature

: Justin Tager, on exchange from Columbus College of Art and Design, self-installed in his piece "Zzzzzz"; "Justin Tager attempts to gain enough 'natural' comfort to fall asleep in a human-scale nest despite the lack of privacy" . Photo by Mark Bocek.

“Interventions” Brings Art to Nature

: Dave Nelson (AR '15) with tools, behind him in the trees is "Configuration"; "A formal investigation about the relation of oppositional lines and materials" . Photo by Mark Bocek.

“Interventions” Brings Art to Nature

: Molly Heinritz (AR '15) and friend man the exhibition entry table as exhibition goers pick up the site map with riddle book by LaraAnn Sabih (AR '16) "Grab a Book and Take a Look"; Heinritz' installation was "Domestication"; "Investigation into the domestication of plants". Photo by Mark Bocek.

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In the woods of Clark Lake Park, Cornish students create works that draw the viewer towards a deeper appreciation of nature.

The weather was struggling towards a beautiful spring day on April 26, a little chilly, but bright. At a park near Kent, 20 miles south of Seattle, Cornish assistant professor Ruth Tomlinson’s Art 346 class was in full swing installing Interventions, a exhibition of site-specific art works. Along the winding trails of Clark Lake Park, next to temporary, numbered stakes, 11 pieces by class members explored the relationship of people and society to nature. All around Seattle, within an easy drive is the spectacular natural wonder that is the Pacific Northwest, and Clark Lake represents this well. Intervention Projects were Jayme Aumann Ice, Savannah Filson Domestic Ground, Carly Garza Tree Reliefs, Molly Heinritz Domestication, Hohn Lee Memory, Lauren MacDonald A Quiet Place, Dave Nelson Configuration, Ashleigh Robb Orbis, LaraAnn Sabih Grab a Book and Take a Look, Aiko Szymczak Earth’s Core Fluidity, and Justin Tager Zzzzzz.

The works focused on key aspects of the park. Several, like the return to the lake of its frozen water with Ice and the small, captured pools of Earth’s Core Fluidity examined the relationship of water and earth. Others juxtaposed views of human habitation and nature, such as displaced living room of Domestic Ground, the gazebo of A Quiet Place, the potted plants among the natural in Domestication, and the “human nest” of Zzzzzz. Then there was the exploration of human spacial relationships and the natural order with the hot pink geometry of Orbis and the plastic pseudo-branches of Configuration. Memory washed a section of the trail with soothing sound and in Tree Reliefs, Carly Garza crafted an appreciation of the form of growing things by coating a tree’s bark with wash-away clay and taking a relief print by rubbing it onto cloth. Attempting to bring all the work together was Sabih’s Grab a Book and Take a Look, which presented exhibition goers with a handmade booklet they could stamp at every site.

Tomlinson knows the park well. She used to live in Kent, and worked with her neighbors to create Clark Lake Park. Stonework she created is a centerpiece of the park’s development. So there was a tight correspondence between Interventions in this place and the course that shares its name “Interventions: inside & outside.” The course set out to explore “works/acts of intervention in relationship to specific site,” according to its description. “Aspects of installation art, street art, environmental sculpture, earthworks, performance art, and especially site-specificity will be studied in preparation for the development of individual and/or collaborative interventions. Course work includes experimentation, concept development, research, proposals, ‘expert’ panel reviews and ultimately the creation of temporary site-specific works. Interventions: inside & outside invites all media and encourages inter/cross disciplinary approaches.”

Interventions was open to the public for three hours of discovery on Saturday. By the next day, the works had been removed and the environment returned to its original condition.


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