close

Faculty and Staff Email Login:

If your email account has not been moved to Google by I.T., then login here using Outlook Web Access:
webmail.cornish.edu/

If your email account has moved to Google by the I.T. Department, then login here:
mail.google.com


Going with the Flow

Going with the Flow

: First-year Cornish dance students perform for National Water Dance. Photo by Mark Bocek.

Going with the Flow

: First-year Cornish dance students perform for National Water Dance. Photo by Mark Bocek.

Going with the Flow

: First-year Cornish dance students perform for National Water Dance. Photo by Mark Bocek.

Going with the Flow

: First-year Cornish dance students perform for National Water Dance. Photo by Mark Bocek.

Going with the Flow

: First-year Cornish dance students perform for National Water Dance. Photo by Mark Bocek.

Going with the Flow

: First-year Cornish dance students perform for National Water Dance. Photo by Mark Bocek.

Going with the Flow

: First-year Cornish dance students perform for National Water Dance. Photo by Mark Bocek.

Going with the Flow

: First-year Cornish dance students perform for National Water Dance. Photo by Mark Bocek.

Going with the Flow

: Student performance for National Water Dance gathers a crowd. Photo by Mark Bocek.

Prev · Next

Cornish dancers join others across the country as part of the National Water Dance project.

On April 12 at precisely 1:00 p.m., first-year dance students from Cornish danced across a footbridge on the south shore of Lake Union, their choreography synchronized with dancers across the country, all of whom were participating in the National Water Dance (NWD) project. 

NWD is intended to focus the public’s attention on environmental issues—specifically issues related to water—by creating community awareness through the arts.  According to the NWD website, this year’s national-scale project grew out of the 2011 Florida Waterways Dance Project, which was “a statewide, simultaneous, site-specific, performance presented at various water sites around Florida and live streamed on the Internet.”  By harnessing the power of dance to build community and effect social change and by taking the project national, NWD seeks to create a “water ethic” across the United States.  This year participants in the NWD project were dancing far north as Alaska and as far south as the tip of Florida.  Though most ensembles were college and university-based, NWD included elementary-school-aged dancers as well.

Cornish first-year dance students created the site-specific dance.  Using Lake Union as a backdrop on one side and the towers of downtown Seattle on the other, the Cornish dancers moved with the fluidity of water itself, traversing up and down the walkways near the Museum of History and Industry and attracting a sizable contingent of curious onlookers and amateur photographers. The work reached its crescendo when the dancers ringed a large, round pool on the grounds of Lake Union Park. The park is located just a few blocks north of Cornish’s main campus.

Cornish participation in the NWD project was spearheaded by dance instructors Alia Swersky and Cyrus Khambatta, instructors for Compositional Practices, and environmental scientist and assistant professor Erica Howard from Humanities & Sciences.  This team, brought together by Dance Department Chair Kitty Daniels, worked with the dancers to choreograph the site-specific, structured improvisational dance piece.  Its creation was informed by shared readings, discussion, reflection, and movement experimentation on the theme of water and the way it flows through our environment. 

To learn more about the National Water Dance project and to see video clips of some of the other site-specific works, visit http://se.nationalwaterdance.org/ With the aid of cellphone video cameras and Google Hangouts, over 30 of the NWD performances were streamed live on the internet and then made available on YouTube as a series of four montage videos. The Cornish students’ performance can be spotted throughout video #2 of the four, embedded below.


Recently

View Archive