close

Faculty and Staff Email Login:

If your email account has not been moved to Google by I.T., then login here using Outlook Web Access:
webmail.cornish.edu/

If your email account has moved to Google by the I.T. Department, then login here:
mail.google.com


Caimi Featured in Hi-Fructose

Caimi Featured in Hi-Fructose

: She Got a Hold of My LIpstick, oil on canvas, 30"x30"; courtesy of the artist.

Caimi Featured in Hi-Fructose

: Courtesy of the artist.

Caimi Featured in Hi-Fructose

: Courtesy of the artist.

Caimi Featured in Hi-Fructose

: Courtesy of the artist.

Caimi Featured in Hi-Fructose

: Courtesy of the artist.

Caimi Featured in Hi-Fructose

: Courtesy of the artist.

Prev · Next

Dorielle Caimi (AR ’10) paints lush, evocative canvases steeped in the mysterious experiences of women; now they’re featured in Hi-Fructose magazine’s site.

The paintings are unabashedly symbolic — and, although beautiful, more than a little disturbing. “My work is not for the faint of heart,” says the artist, Cornish grad Dorielle Caimi. This didn’t stop a leading arts magazine, Hi-Fructose, from publishing them on their site. Indeed, their emotional impact probably tipped the scale. For Caimi, the acceptance in the publication was a great step forward for her career.

“Hi-Fructose is where my favorite artists show their work,” says Caimi, “Being accepted in the magazine makes me feel like I’m amongst peers.” She is particularly fond of Jenny Morgan, Kent Williams, Korehiko Hino, Jen Mann and Martin Wittfooth.

Caimi’s work is in the basic form of portraiture. Typically, she works with the nude female body, juxtaposing her subjects with images of animals. Other canvases show bizarre behavior or grotesque occurrences. The paintings are striking and the symbolism is potent. Symbols, in one major line of thinking, are images we use to express things we only partially understand, and this is the intellectual world of the work. The artist is as much at a loss as anyone else as to what the ultimate meaning is of her pictures. “I don’t know what my work is about as I do it,” Caimi says. “I discover later what its meaning may be.”

Though the ultimate meaning is elusive, and the more evocative for that, there is a basis for the images in Caimi’s life. “All the paintings represent things I’ve personally gone through.” As she tells it, being misunderstood has been problem all her life, but there is a good side to it: it has informed her art. “I’ve always done things wrong, the way I think is weird,” she says. “What I come up with is bizarre and abstract. But in the art world, the way I think is very accepted.”

The way she paints has a feminist layer to it that she is adamant about, especially the nudes. There is no effort on Caimi’s part to make her subjects look pretty. “Women are painted too sexually,” in her view. They are often portrayed as “hyper-sexual pop icons with puffy lips.” If this view or any other affects her sales, she has no regrets. She tried producing works that were popular, but it felt wrong. “I was considering audiences too carefully. Forget about audience, I want to paint what moves me.”

Dorielle learned classic portraiture from her father, who is also an artist, and at colleges in New Mexico, including UNM. She credits Cornish with taking her work to the next step. “Cornish was very challenging. I came in doing classical painting. Cornish was maddening,” she says. “It threw my classical thought out the window. But it taught me to think critically about my process, so my work wasn’t just painting or drawing something anymore.”

Currently Dorielle is showing in galleries around Albequerque, where she and her husband moved after her graduation. Starting next year, however, her work will be handled almost exclusively at the Gusford Gallery in Los Angeles. This is a Cornish connection. The gallery’s owner and director, Kelsey Lee Offield (AR ‘09) and Dorielle used to take painting classes together.

ALSO: check out this great interview with Dorielle at Combustus.


Recently

View Archive